Monday, March 8, 2010

GENE TRAIT SUSPECTED IN MOMS OF GAY SONS

Gene trait suspected in moms of gay sons
Randy Dotinga, PlanetOut Network
Wednesday, February 22, 2006
Scientists may have found more evidence for a genetic origin to homosexuality,
thanks to a study of mothers with two or more gay sons.
Scientists have reported that they've found an "extremely unusual" trait in the cells
of some mothers with two or more gay sons, providing more evidence to suggest
that homosexuality might be inherited.
Mothers of multiple gay sons were about six times more likely than other women to
process their X chromosomes in a certain way, researchers discovered.
Researchers aren't entirely sure what the findings mean, said study co-author Sven
Bocklandt, a postdoctoral researcher at UCLA. Making things more complicated,
about 75 percent of mothers of multiple gay sons don't have the trait. Still, the
study, released Tuesday in the journal Human Genetics, raises plenty of questions,
Bocklandt said, especially as researchers try to figure out whether homosexuality has
genetic roots and if there truly is a "gay gene" -- or genes.
"What everybody wants is the gene, and we don’t have it yet," Bocklandt said. "But
this is an independent confirmation that the X chromosome is involved."
Bocklandt and colleagues looked at a phenomenon known as X-chromosome
inactivation, in which cells inside the bodies of females automatically turn off -- or
inactivate -- one of their two X chromosomes. That leaves them with one working X
chromosome -- just like males, who have a single X and a single Y chromosome.
Normally, each cell in a female's body randomly turns off one or the other X
chromosome. In some cases, such as when families share a genetic disease, there is
"extreme skewing" -- one X chromosome is more likely to be turned off than the
other, Bocklandt said.
In the new study, the researchers looked at 97 mothers of one or more gay sons and
103 women with no gay sons to see what their blood cells did with their X
chromosomes. The researchers recruited many of the women with the help of PFLAG.
They found that nearly a quarter of the mothers of multiple gay sons inactivated the
same X chromosome -- in other words, nonrandomly -- compared to just 4 percent
of the women without gay sons. Of those with one gay son, 13 percent inactivated
the same X chromosome.
Dr. Ionel Sandovici, a genetics researcher at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge,
England, who is familiar with the research findings, cautioned that the study is small,
with just 44 mothers of multiple gay sons being examined. More research in larger
groups must be done to confirm the results, Sandovici said.
The research does provide "circumstantial evidence" that the X chromosome
contributes to the development of male sexuality, Sandovici said. But "we still
understand very little about molecular mechanisms of sexual orientation, and this
seems to be rather a complicated biological puzzle."

THIS REPORT CLEARLY SHOWS THAT GAYS ARE NOT AT FAULT. SO PLEASE DONT BLAME YOURSELF OR WHOMSOEVER HAS A FAMILY PERSON WITH THIS ORIENTATION SHOULD FEEL PROUD. ALTHOUGH MANY OTHER RESEARCH HAS ALSO DONE AND I WILL DISCLOSE THEM TO YOU ASAP.

Total Pageviews

Follow by Email